Category: -
 

Photographic proof of my little experiment (note completely full mug)


i'm a pretty cynical person, and i'll be the first to admit it.  every once in a while i like to put one of my the-world-is-conspiring-against-me theories to the test.  one of these most recent tests had to do with a latte from Starbucks.  you see, in Europe (and perhaps in some more enlightened geographic areas) you have the option of getting your Starbucks hot drinks either in a real ceramic mug, or in the standard carry-out, lidded paper cups.  this means that in London-area Starbucks they have three different sized mugs to correspond with the better-known paper cup sizes called Tall, Grande and Venti.

my paranoid little theory, having spent my adulthood in America where all Starbucks use paper cups, was that the short, ceramic mugs offered to "dine-in" customers didn't hold as much coffee, latte, etc. as the paper cups.  my companion and i were recently sitting in a Starbucks for a prolonged period of time, during which several lattes were ordered, so i decided to do a little experiment.

there was a Venti latte on the table, so when it was empty i went and ordered another Venti latte, but asked for a to-go cup.  then i went back to the table, took the lid off and poured the cup into the ceramic mug.  much to my surprise, the Venti mug held EXACTLY the same amount of liquid as the tall, narrow paper cup -- like, EXACTLY the same.

i guess when you run a monstrous, global chain like Starbucks you pretty much have everything down to a science -- especially concerning how much coffee is poured into a "large" cup or mug.  i suppose if there's one nice thing to be said about Starbucks it's that they've got their serving sizes measured perfectly.

just don't get me started on their "running-tap" policy.i'm a pretty cynical person, and i'll be the first to admit it.  every once in a while i like to put one of my the-world-is-conspiring-against-me theories to the test.  one of these most recent tests had to do with a latte from Starbucks.  you see, in Europe (and perhaps in some more enlightened geographic areas) you have the option of getting your Starbucks hot drinks either in a real ceramic mug, or in the standard carry-out, lidded paper cups.  this means that in London-area Starbucks they have three different sized mugs to correspond with the better-known paper cup sizes called Tall, Grande and Venti.

my paranoid little theory, having spent my adulthood in America where all Starbucks use paper cups, was that the short, ceramic mugs offered to "dine-in" customers didn't hold as much coffee, latte, etc. as the paper cups.  my companion and i were recently sitting in a Starbucks for a prolonged period of time, during which several lattes were ordered, so i decided to do a little experiment.

there was a Venti latte on the table, so when it was empty i went and ordered another Venti latte, but asked for a to-go cup.  then i went back to the table, took the lid off and poured the cup into the ceramic mug.  much to my surprise, the Venti mug held EXACTLY the same amount of liquid as the tall, narrow paper cup -- like, EXACTLY the same.

i guess when you run a monstrous, global chain like Starbucks you pretty much have everything down to a science -- especially concerning how much coffee is poured into a "large" cup or mug.  i suppose if there's one nice thing to be said about Starbucks it's that they've got their serving sizes measured perfectly.

just don't get me started on their "running-tap" policy.